National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month Celebrated at BCFS Health and Human Services-Kerrville

Despite Historic Declines in Teen Pregnancy and Teen Birth Rates, There is Still More Work to be Done According to Local Nonprofit BCFS-Kerrville

Despite historic declines in the rates of teen pregnancy and birth rates in the United States, and an 11% reduction in the teen pregnancy rate in Texas, it is still the case that roughly one in four teen girls become pregnant before age 20 in the United States. In addition, Texas has the 45th highest teen pregnancy rate in the country. To focus attention on the progress that has been made addressing the issue of teen pregnancy, and spotlight how much work is yet to be done, BCFS-Kerrville joins organizations across the country in participating in National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month.

Throughout the month of May, BCFS-Kerrville will provide free pregnancy prevention classes for girls, ages 14-19. The classes will be 1-hour long and utilize an evidence-based, interactive video called Seventeen Days to engage and educate the young women. The movie depicts real-life scenarios young women face in romantic relationships, and encourages the viewers to choose how they would respond in each scenario to learn about risk, health and safety. Participation is confidential and all youth will receive prizes upon completing the 1-hour program. For more information or to schedule a class for you or your teen, please contact Kathy Rice at (830) 928-1597.

“We are pleased to bring this interactive program to the community as part of National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month. We recognize that teen pregnancy is a year-round issue that greatly impacts the youth of our nation, and young women in the Hill Country,” said Dennis Ferguson, Director-Community Services at BCFS-Kerrville. “We serve youth who have experienced abuse or neglect, those with an unstable home life, and teens from families that are living in poverty – it’s precisely this population that is most at-risk of teen pregnancy. So we strive to connect them to services, programs and mentors that help them make wise decisions about their health and their futures.”


BCFS Health and Human Services-Kerrville helps local families, youth from foster care and teens and young adults struggling with homelessness. BCFS-Kerrville provides transitional shelter, counseling, life skills programs, mentorships and more. For more information about BCFS-Kerrville, visit DiscoverBCFS.net/Kerrville.

Lubbock Men’s “Steak n’ Eggs” Breakfast Raises $70,000 for Local Youth

The inaugural Men’s “Field of Dreams” Steak and Eggs Benefit Breakfast raised $70,000 toward much-needed services for local teens and young adults provided at BCFS’ Lubbock Transition Center.

Local community and business leaders – including Representative John Frullo, County Judge Tom Head, Judge Kevin Hart, Judge Kara Darnell, and Juvenile Justice Chief William Carter – gathered for the Men’s “Field of Dreams” Steak and Eggs Benefit Breakfast, hosted by BCFS Health and Human Services. The event raised $70,000, which includes a dollar-for-dollar match by the organization’s parent agency, BCFS, a system of health and human services organizations with locations and programs from coast-to-coast and around the world. The funds raised will be put toward much-needed services for local teens and young adults provided at BCFS’ Lubbock Transition Center.
Guest speaker Jimmy “The Rookie” Morris, whose life inspired the book and movie “The Rookie,” attended the breakfast to share inspirational words about not giving up on your dreams. Approximately 125 guests enjoyed a steak and eggs breakfast, live music and a viewing of classic cars at the Mckenzie-Merket Alumni Center. Title sponsor, Reagor-Dykes Auto, and  ASCO Equipment Company – who was also a sponsor – helped make the inaugural benefit a great success.
“BCFS is proud to come alongside several private foundations, businesses and individual philanthropists that have invested in the life-changing work happening at our transition center,” said BCFS CEO Kevin Dinnin, surprising the crowd by announcing a match of every dollar raised during the breakfast. “Without question, this center makes a profound impact in the lives of children and young adults who are struggling. In turn, we raise the tide for the community as a whole, making Lubbock and surrounding areas a safer and more prosperous place to call home.”
The BCFS Lubbock Transition Center is a safe-haven for local youth, many of whom are at-risk of homelessness, poverty or other challenges that could inhibit a successful transition into adulthood and independence. The center serves youth in foster care, those in the juvenile justice system, and other young adults who are struggling by providing case management, counseling, mentorships, assistance with education, employment and housing location.
“BCFS is proud to be part of a community that is so in tune with the needs of its youth,” said Kami Jackson, director of the BCFS center. “When we provide young men and women with educational and economic opportunity, and serve as a stabilizing force in their tumultuous lives, it’s good for the entire Lubbock community. The men that enjoyed breakfast with us are part of that stabilizing force for the next generation in Lubbock.”
Morris shared his story – brought to the big screen starring actor Dennis Quaid – recalling how he dreamed of playing major league baseball growing up, but injuries and life got in the way. Ten years after he walked away from the minor leagues, became a father and a high school baseball coach, he told his team if they won their local championship he would try out again for the big leagues. When he kept his word and tried out, he finally achieved his Big League, childhood dreams at the age of 35.
“Many of the youth we serve have suffered some kind of abuse or neglect in their past,” said Jackson. “So Jimmy’s advice to never give up really resonates with our youth. This event will go a long way towards helping us continue our work with young people who are struggling.”
For more information about BCFS Lubbock Transition Center services, visit DiscoverBCFS.net/Lubbock or call (806) 792-0526.
To support the work of the transition center by donating, contact Kathleen Maxwell-Rambie at (806) 792-0526, give securely online, or send checks to 125 Chicago Avenue, Lubbock, Texas 79416.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

BCFS Health and Human Services to Hold Candlelight Vigil to Honor Those Affected by Violence 

According to the Texas Council on Family Violence, more than 100 women are killed each year as a result of domestic violence. Abuse at the hands of a boyfriend, spouse or other intimate partner has touched the lives of more than 1-in-3 women in the state. Recognizing October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month not only remembers victims – and survivors – but also increases understanding of how to prevent and protect against domestic violence.
“It is commonplace to hear things like, ‘it’s not domestic violence because I’ve never been hit’ or ‘it’s not really domestic violence because he only does it when he’s mad,’” said Raquel Frausto, senior program director for BCFS Health and Human Services (BCFS HHS), Del Rio’s service provider for individuals affected by domestic violence.
“Rather than report abusive actions, people may shy away from the term ‘domestic violence,’ finding it too harsh of a description of what is occurring,” Frausto continued. “Whatever the reason for the confusion, everyone needs to understand the basics of domestic violence and how to respond when it occurs.”
BCFS HHS operates Del Rio’s domestic violence program, offering direct services to individuals in Val Verde and surrounding counties that include access to emergency care, safety planning, and coordination of legal assistance in civil and criminal cases.
On Thursday, October 17, BCFS HHS will hold a candlelight vigil in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The event, called Breaking the Silence: Speak Up and Be Heard, will be held at the Casa de la Cultura from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Domestic violence is a pattern of behavior in a relationship used to gain or maintain “power and control” over an intimate partner. Such abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological. It can include action or threats of action to influence another person, such as sexual assault, stalking or any behavior that frightens, intimidates, terrorizes, manipulates, humiliates, blames or injures someone else. Examples include withholding money from a partner, threatening to kill pets or children, threatening to kill oneself in the event of a breakup or divorce, or constantly belittling or criticizing an intimate partner.
Domestic violence is not limited to gender, class, race, religion, economic status, age or sexual orientation. Whether a couple is married, living together, divorced or dating, any pattern of behavior used to maintain power and control over a partner is considered to be domestic violence.
If you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-779-SAFE (7233) or call BCFS HHS at 830-768-2755. All help is FREE and CONFIDENTIAL.