BCFS Health and Human Services awarded grant to teach parenting skills with Fatherhood EFFECT

The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services awarded BCFS Health and Human Services a five-year contract to lead a community-based parenting program geared toward improving the communication and parenting skills of fathers and male caregivers.

ABILENE/MCALLEN – The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services awarded BCFS Health and Human Services a five-year contract to lead a community-based parenting program geared toward improving the communication and parenting skills of fathers and male caregivers. The program, called Fatherhood EFFECT (Educating Fathers For Empowering Children Tomorrow), is expected to serve roughly 300 families annually in Cameron and Taylor counties.The Fatherhood EFFECT program will teach families how to resolve conflict, improve communication, deal with complex emotions, and overcome issues of aggression, alcohol and violence. BCFS Health and Human Services will use the “24/7 Dad” curriculum to lead the classes, which focuses on the characteristics of a good father like discipline and achieving a healthy work-family balance.

“Being a responsible parent involves making decisions in the best interest of your child. It also means learning from mistakes and making better choices in the future to ensure children feel safe and loved – no matter what,” said Terri Hipps, executive director of BCFS’ Community Services Division. “Strengthening communication and learning more about the perspectives of all members of a household are proven ways to mitigate abuse and build an unbreakable bond within a family.”
Families in Taylor or Cameron counties with children younger than 17 years old, who do not have an open CPS case or a previously substantiated case of abuse or neglect, are eligible to participate in the free program. Parents who participate in the six-week course will receive wraparound support services, including referrals to other community providers and assistance meeting their basic needs.
In Abilene and McAllen, BCFS Health and Human Services also operates transition centers that serve local youth aging out of foster care, those in the juvenile justice system, and others at risk of poverty, homelessness, substance abuse and other challenges, helping them transition successfully into adulthood and independence. In Abilene, the organization also operates Our House, a residential facility that provides transitional shelter for young men who are struggling with homelessness. In McAllen, BCFS HHS operates another parenting education course called Texas Families: Together and Safe.
For more information, families in Taylor County may call (325) 692-0033, those in Cameron County may call (956) 630-0010, or visit DiscoverBCFS.net/FatherhoodEFFECT.